My Biggest JIRA Pet Peeve

The never-ending to do list in my department is managed by the web app JIRA, built by Atlassian. Each JIRA ticket is one feature we’re building, one question we need to look into, or one problem we need to solve. As the one QA manager supporting a thirteen-person development, project management, and design team along with a six-person data news team and over one hundred internal producers, I write a lot of tickets. Every ticket is assigned to a person. When a ticket is created or edited, the Reporter (most often me) and the Assignee get an email. Once you add Watchers to the ticket, they also get an email.

I want to add Watchers when I create a ticket in JIRA. I want my project managers to get an email when I find a bug so I don’t have to chat them the URL. I want my UX designers to get an email so I make sure the behavior I’m expecting is the behavior they’re expecting. I want to copy more than one developer when I don’t know who created the bug. I want to copy the lead developer so he knows how his developers are spending their time. I don’t want to create a ticket, click through to the ticket before the green notification disappears from the top of my window, add the Watchers, and then change the Priority or the Summary so all relevant parties know this new ticket exists.

Others agree with me. There are 232 Watchers and 417 Votes on this Atlassian ticket requesting the feature. Every six months, Atlassian reevaluates the tickets in the backlog and lets us know that this ticket won’t be addressed in the next twelve months. As a Watcher, I get an email about it.

Originally published at murphyslawtester.wordpress.com on February 10, 2014 and duplicated on Medium.